Ana Peláez Narváez is the first woman with a disability  elected for the U.N. Committee on Elimination of Discrimination against Women

7 June 2018
Ana leads a protest

We are very happy to announce the election of Ana Peláez Narváez as a member of the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. She is the first woman with disabilities ever to be elected as a member of the U.N. Committee on Elimination of Discrimination against Women, which has existed for 37 years. We welcome her election a very positive step which brings “nothing about us without us” closer to reality. 

What is the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women?

The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women is the body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. It consists of 23 independent experts on women’s rights across the world.

The election that took place on the 7th June 2018 envisaged to replace 12 members, whose term end on the 31st December 2018. The elected members will serve a term of 4 years. 

Who is Ana?

Ana Peláez Narváez is a very strong advocate for the estimated 600 million women with disabilities worldwide. She is currently Vice-President of the European Disability Forum and Chairperson of its Women’s Committee; Executive Vice-President of CERMI (Spanish National Council for Persons with Disability) Women Foundation; Executive Councillor for International Relations and External Development of the Spanish National Organisation of the Blind. She was a board member of the European Women’s Lobby from 2010 to 2014. Ana Peláez served for 7 years in the U.N. Committee for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and it was its focal point for gender issues. She participated in the official Spanish delegation that took part in the final drafting phase of the U.N Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. She has championed women’s rights for more than 20 years, advising governments, civil society and other organisations.

Quote

“I believe there is a need to mainstream women and girls with disabilities systematically in the work of CEDAW. We are 20% of the total population of women in the world, but we are among the poorest and we are constantly subjected to aggravated forms of discrimination.   I also want to focus on strengthening the work of the CEDAW Committee in relation to the multiple discrimination many invisible women face, and this means making progress on drawing up guidelines for States Parties to address intersectional discrimination and ensure we leave no one behind. I hope to play an active role in the process to foster co-operation among UN treaty bodies so that they can learn from each other and adopt a consistent approach, moving forward in the same direction when addressing the same issues.

Finally, I believe we need to do more to reflect the dimensions of human diversity in the CEDAW Committee and, in particular, include people from invisible and ignored population groups, such as women with disabilities.

NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US!”

Woman with disabilities – especially vulnerable to discrimination and violence

There more than 600 million women with disabilities that are especially vulnerable to discrimination and violence. Despite facing intersectional discrimination, women with disabilities are not sufficiently represented in bodies that focus on equality and gender issues.

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