What are the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development enshrines 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets to be achieved over the next 15 years.

It emphasizes the importance of promoting universal respect of human rights and human dignity. It is built on the guiding principles of the Charter of the United Nations (UN) and international law. It is also informed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights treaties such as the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The SDGs are actually the chapter three of the 2030 Agenda, which also includes:

  • the Preamble
  • the Declaration
  • the Means of Implementation and the Global Partnership
  • and the Follow-up and Review

On 1 January 2016, the SDGs officially came into force. Over the next 15 years, the new Goals will rely on the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and intend to complete what they did not achieve by 2030.

There are 17 SDGs, non-binding in nature but they symbolize an unprecedented opportunity to set the world on a sustainable course and ensure a life of dignity for all. The SDGs are universal and they provide a clear policy framework for regulatory actions at national, regional and international level. National governments are expected to align their political agendas  with the SDGs.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development enshrines 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets to be achieved over the next 15 years.

The 2030 Agenda emphasizes the importance of promoting universal respect of human rights and human dignity. It is built on the guiding principles of the Charter of the United Nations (UN) and international law. It is also informed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights treaties such as the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The SDGs are actually the chapter three of the 2030 Agenda, among:

  • the Preamble
  • the Declaration
  • the Means of Implementation and the Global Partnership
  • and the Follow-up and Review

The Sustainable Development Goals

Logo of the SDGs with pictures for each if the goals

On 1 January 2016, the SDGs officially came into force. Over the next 15 years, the new Goals will rely on the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and complete what they did not achieve by 2030.

There are 17 SDGs, non-binding in nature but they symbolize an unprecedented opportunity to set the world on a sustainable course and ensure a life of dignity for all. The SDGs are universal and they provide a clear policy framework for regulatory actions at national, regional and international level. National governments are expected to align their political agendas  with the SDGs.

These are: